The international conferences

Resource Availability in a Low Carbon World

In Partnership with Oxford Martin School


  November 2 and 3, 2017
  Oxford, UK
  Strategic Materials

On November 2-3, 2017, the Veolia Institute will be holding its 10th International Conference, in partnership with the Oxford Martin School, on Resource Availability. For this event, the Institute decided to focus on strategic materials for a low-carbon future.
 
The conference will convene experts from social to earth sciences, policy makers, representatives from industry and NGOs to share and discuss knowledge, field experience and best practices, both in developed and developing countries.

Speakers will consider environmental, energetic, social, economic, political and geopolitical as well as governance issues related to transitioning to a low carbon world. They will also look into the opportunities offered by the circular economy, recycling and resource efficiency.

► S.A.P.I.EN.S Special Issue
 
SAPIENS Logo
In order to enrich the insights brought by the international conference, the Veolia Institute has decided to publish a special issue of S.A.P.I.EN.S that will contain a range of articles that review issues related to resource availability, with a particular focus on materials that are strategic and critical for a low carbon future. 

Articles will be published online throughout October 2017 and succesful articles will be considered for presentation at the conference.

The Institute launches a call for papers that details the submission process, the key topics and key dates. 
 
Call for Papers (EN)
PDF - 262.78 KB










► About our partner: The Oxford Martin School
 

The Oxford Martin School  at the University of Oxford is a world-leading centre of pioneering research that addresses global challenges. The School’s research cuts across disciplines to tackle a wide range of issues including climate change, net zero carbon investment, the future of food, automation and employment, and pandemics. The School supports novel, high risk and multidisciplinary projects that may not fit within conventional funding channels, but which could dramatically improve the wellbeing of this and future generations.